GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (KREX) — Although a statewide arrest warrant has been issued for embattled former Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters, District Attorney Dan Rubenstein has indicated he’s open to nullifying the warrant on the condition that she shows up for a newly ordered court appearance.

Although a judge approved a Mesa County District Attorney’s Office request to REVOKE bond June 14, after Peters had traveled to a Mike Lindell event in Clark County, Nevada and violated new bond stipulations, Rubenstein says Peter’s attorney accepted blame for not advising her of the new travel stipulations.

Ms. Peters is currently free on a cash bond of $25,000. The court allowed Peter’s to fundraise outside of the state of Colorado during her recent campaign for Secretary of State, if she notified the court at least 72 hours in advance. Peters lost her primary election June 28. Rubenstein says she later emailed her attorney July 7th stating she would travel to Nevada for a conference from July 8th to July 11th and temporarily leave the state of Colorado. Rubenstein told KREX today, Peter’s attorney neglected to let Peters know that on July 11, the prosecution filed an objection to Peter’s leaving the state as she was no longer running for office and travel was no longer a necessity. Peters did not learn of that filing until July 13 after she had already gone to Nevada to speak at yet another live stream event for the business man known as My Pillow Guy, Mike Lindell.

On July 12th, 2022, the Colorado Secretary of State received an electronic letter from Ms. Peter’s stating that Peter’s signed a notary letter from Clark County, Nevada. DA Rubenstein received a copy of that letter one day later, July 13. Rubenstein’s original motion to REVOKE bond stated Peter’s letter was previously sworn and signed by a person in Colorado but notary Laurince Lovelife crossed out the word Colorado and replaced it with Clark County, Nevada.

On July 12th, 2022 a District Attorney Investigator found footage of Ms. Peters on Frankspeech.com showing Peters onstage at the Las Vegas conference. Peters original travel request did not include the dates July 12th, when Peters sent the notorized document or July 13th during which time she was still traveling. Rubenstein’s original objection to travel on July 11 pointed out Ms. Peters lost the campaign and is no longer considered a candidate. It stated, “The people believe that Ms. Peters needs to be treated like all other criminal defendants on bond and needs to file a motion asking for a modification of her bond conditions, and get permission from the court prior to traveling.” The objection to notice of travel also noted Peters had shown from travel prior to the election that she “has the means to flee if she wants to.”

July 14 Peter’s lawyer Harvey Steinberg filed a motion to QUASH the warrant for Peter’s arrest. Steinberg’s motion argues that Peters did not know she would violate her bond by leaving the state July 12. It also notes Peters complied with her previous bond arrangement. Her violation Steinberg says falls on him for not informing her.

Despite Rubenstein’s note in the objection to travel stating Peter’s ability to flee, he told KREX July 14, in consideration of Peter’s attorney’s admission that he was to blame for not notifying his client, Rubenstein says he would not object to QUASHING the warrant if Peters appears in court.

There is currently a statewide warrant out for Tina Peter’s arrest.

As of the evening of July 14, Rubenstein says Peters is in Denver. Peters and her attorney requested an online hearing but Mesa County Judge Matt Barrett instead ordered Peters to appear with her attorney in court the afternoon of Friday, July 15th.

Following her court date, Peters will have another court appearance on August 5th.

Tina Peters Charges include:

  • Allegations of Attempting to Influence a Public Servant
  • Criminal Impersonation
  • Conspiracy to Commit Criminal Impersonation
  • Attempt to Influence a public servant
  • Criminal Impersonation- Cause Liability
  • Conspiracy to Commit Criminal Impersonation
  • Identity Theft- Use Information to Obtain Things of Value
  • First Degree Official Misconduct
  • Violation of Duty
  • Failure to Comply with Requirements of Secretary of State